An Easy Way to Paint Plantation Shutters

Giving some color to those old shutters

Know that plantation shutters are easy to paint. If your window coverings over the years have lost their color, you don’t have to spend tones of money replacing them, but you can simply repaint them. This will encourage you to not only offer some color and shine to your old shutters, but also to refresh the interior look. This applies especially to some neutral colored shutters, because white or cream colors tend to become dirty over time or otherwise damaged. Well, that’s the perfect opportunity to start repainting project with plantation shutters.I strongly suggest you to visit Plantation Shutters Henley to learn more about this.

Seek to prepare all of the moves before the project begins. This way you will avoid possible problems later, since it will be too late to go back once you have started painting. This involves finding all the things you need, and deciding where you will be painting the shutters. Also, because you’ll need to take the shutters down, make sure you remember (or even write down) what you’ve done, because this way you’ll have no trouble putting the shutters back up. Just follow the next few steps and in no time you’ll receive a freshly painted window treatment.

Shutters Moves in Painting

As already mentioned, the first thing you’ll have to do is to remove the shutters from the window. It is necessary to mark each panel properly, in order to return it to the correct location once the painting is finished. It also refers to hinges and other hardware, as any variation can cause problems with alignment. When you remove the shutters from the windows it will be best to remove all the hardware connected to the doors, such as hinges, hooks or knobs. This will only take a screwdriver and a couple of minutes but it will save you all the time trying to cover or otherwise mask these or even worse, trying to remove paint that ended up there somehow. Also, take this opportunity to check if any hardware needs repairing or replacing.

The next step is proper panel cleanup. Make sure that this is done thoroughly, as any dirt or debris trapped on the surface will not only make it more difficult for the paint to adhere, but can also affect the smoothness of your freshly painted shutter surface. This can be done with nothing more than a small amount of detergent and some warm water. Lastly, don’t start painting until the surface is completely dry.

The next thing you’ll need to do is clean the shutters using a few metal paint scraper and some sandpaper. This way you get much easier to paint on a smooth surface. Don’t overdo the scraping though because you don’t want to damage the panels in any way.

It would be wide to use some water based priming before applying the paint to your plantation shutters. Covering the entire surface with a thin priming coat will make it much easier for the paint to stick, regardless of which paint was used earlier.

When it comes to painting technique, a brush or some spray paint can be used. While the use of a brush may seem pleasant, it usually takes a long time (depending on the size of the brush and the size of your shutters), but it can also cause potential problems to the operating mechanism of your shutter. Namely, there is a risk that any paint will get into the spaces between the louvers and the frame (regardless of how careful you are) which will affect how easily the shutters open or close as they leak later.

Once you’ve decided how your plantation shutters will be lit, prepare the work place. You can either hang the panels that will allow you to paint both sides simultaneously or place them on the floor, previously covered with some newspaper or an old cloth, meaning you’ll have to paint one side and once it’s dry turn the panel and paint the other.

Finally, you can begin the job of painting the shutters. If you’ve opted for a paint brush, use flat brushes to more evenly apply the paint. Smooth paint, and even strikes. If you have chosen to use spray paint, just shake the can before you start and apply the paint vertically rather than horizontally. Keep the can from the panels about 30 centimeters away and smoothly spray the color with no abrupt moves that can cause smudges and color shades to differ. One layer of paint should do the trick but you can add another layer if you want a more vivid shade.