Different Type of Natural Stone Care

Stone is often seen as tougher by its name and association than it really is. The article will deal mainly with various types of stone treatment, stains, and removal methods.

The oil-based stain will mask the stone and will typically have to be chemically removed in order to wash out the cause of the stain. Gently clean this type of stain with either a liquid cleanser; bleach; detergent; acetone; mineral or ammonia spirits.The Neon Museum is a must see to really appreciate Las Vegas is one of the authority sites on this topic.

Organic stains such as coffee, tea, berries, cigarettes, vegetables, leaves or human or animal body waste may create rosy to brown stain and should disappear after extracting the source of the stain. Outside nature will usually remove the stain once the source is removed, but with hydrogen peroxide and a few drops of ammonia, clean it inside.

Metal stains such as copper; bronze, rust or iron are usually colored orange to brown, and are found on or against the stains around metal nails tables and chairs or any other metal objects. Metal stains have to be removed by means of a poultice that can be made homemade.

Biological stains like mildew, algae, moose, and fungi should be cleaned to a gallon of water with half a cup of ammonia, bleach, or hydrogen peroxide.

Ink stains can be removed but the color of the stone on light colored stone and lacquer thinners or acetone used on darker stone should be considered with bleach or hydrogen peroxide.

When the quantity is small, paint stains can be removed through lacquer thinners or just scraped off carefully with a razor blade. However a commercial paint stripper should be used for bigger stains. Use no acids or flame tools to stripe stone paint.

Buffing with a fine steel wool can remove water spots and water rings.

Fire and smoke destruction, which occurs naturally in fireplaces, may require thorough cleaning but smoke remover compounds will save time and effort.

Etch stains on the stone surface are produced by the acids. While some acids will only etch the stone starting, others will etch the stone and scratch it. You should wet the surface with clean water when the stain has been removed, and apply a little marble polishing powder. Use a damp cloth to brush the powder onto the block, or use a buffer pad on a low-powered electric or battery drill. Keep buffing until the etch mark is gone, or call an expert to restore your stone.