Things To Look For In A Mold Contractor

Make sure the contractor is trained and up-to-date regarding current procedures. The contractor should be IICRC accredited in Applied Microbial Remediation, authorised if appropriate, should have general liability as well as policies for contamination. (Regular liability insurance DOES NOT cover the mold) and for at least 3-5 years the contractor will promise their job. The Better Business Bureau is also an excellent resource. There is no shortage of disinformation and corrupt vendors, so do your research. Click here to enable the notifications for A-1 Certified Environmental Services, LLC details here.

3rd party air quality expert identified as industrial hygienist should always be employed in the mold remediation industry to direct the operation in all but the smallest schemes to be checked through scientific means that the mold rates have been lowered close to background levels. All too often the contractor leaves without checking only to find out that the mold has not been cleaned correctly, leaving the home owner in risk. On a substance as thin as a nail, up to one million mold spores may be present and not be visible to the naked eye (testing is critical!). Next let’s discuss the operation. Design of a remediation strategy should be the first step. The hygienist can often be of assistance with this. The workspace should be segregated on every remediation project by setting up polybarriers, closing off vital barriers such as duct work, openings, walls, flooring holes where liquids join, etc. Next, negative pressure (a vacuum effect in the area) to separate the workspace from the other areas should be created and retained throughout remediation work. It prohibits the transfer of mold spores into unprotected fields. You should also set up air scrubbers which are large HEPA filters that disinfect or scrub mold spores from the soil.

Contaminated transparent products such as wallpaper, drywall & furniture should be sealed bagged and disposed of as usual waste according to local regulations. Everything salvageable framing should be rubbed vigorously with wire or sprayed with media accompanied by a HEPA vacuuming and cleaning with a mild detergent (soap and water works well). Hard chemicals are not required for mold washing, treatment or removal. Perhaps I’d go so far as to suggest that if a contractor decides they’re trying to use bio-cides or antimicrobials to kill mold in your house I’d search elsewhere. In most nations, these are called pests that pose a significant danger to both the inhabitants and consumers. For states including Maine, the remediation companies must be approved to add some disinfectant or antimicrobial agent to master pesticide applicators. Sadly there are many who do not comply with this rule. Often these additives pose more of a challenge than the mold itself. A strong surfactant detergent works best (dawn platter wash, pine sol, etc.). Understanding that destroying mold isn’t the target is important, eliminating mold is the aim by vigorous cleaning and good engineering controls.